Tim Cook Admits iOS 6 Maps Are Bad, Advises Us To Use Bing, MapQuest And Waze

Apple admitting they were defeated it’s not something you see every day. Tim Cook, Apple CEO, has released a statement to apologize about the quality of Maps application in iOS 6 and recommend the Apple customers to use rival products as temporary alternative to the company’s services.

Besides aplogizing for the failure of the iOS 6 Maps application, Apple’s head, Time Cook also admitted that the application developed by the company he runs is below the promised standards. Cook continues his apology letter with a recommendation for the Apple costumers, asking them to try alternative solutions they can find in the App Store, until the Maps application reaches an acceptable level. The Apple CEO suggested applications like Bing Maps, Mapquest and Waze, but also the web applications offered by Nokia and Google.

Tim Cook’s official statement reminds me of the one Steve Jobs issued in 2007, when the mastermind behind Apple products publicly apologized for the iPhone price cut off, which was applied after less than three months since its market debut and drove the early customers crazy.

On the other hand, the Apple officials weren’t so receptive when the iPhone 4 users were complaining about the bad signal and Steve Jobs harsly replyed with “You’re holding it wrong.” Even so, after the Antennagate scandal made the headlines and the complaints kept coming Apple acknowledged the problem and offered special cases meant to fix the signal issues.

Coming only a few days after iOS 6 was officially made available for download, Tim Cook’s message tries to reduce some of the damage brought to the company’s image, even though the Maps problem is far from being solved.

Meanwhile, all the iOS 6 smartphone and tablet can do is hope that the new Maps application will be improved soon and brought to a level that meets their expectations.



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